Tag Archives: Cattle

Farm Matters Grid Layouts

Farm MattersWe are pleased to tell you that the latest version of Farm Matters (Version 2016.4.4) includes a new feature called grid layouts. This feature will allow you to have multiple layouts of a grid and switch between them easily. You could have one layout with columns switched on about breeding, another layout with the weight columns, another for medication, etc.

To switch on this feature load a screen such as On Farm andGrid Layouts go to Tools->Layout Selector. You will see a small toolbox appear called ‘Grid Layouts’. To create a new layout simple click the add button and give the new layout a name (Note: nothing will initially change on the grid). You can then move the columns around as desired for the new layout. If you then want to view the original layout simply select it from the drop down and the layout will change. There is no need to save layouts, this is done automatically when you leave the screen. You can call on the different layouts at any time. This is available on most screens inc. Cattle On Farm, Individual Sheep, Fields, Sales, Purchases, Treatments, Products, etc.

Tag-ie4 EID Reader

Tag-ie4 Handset

Tag-ie4 EID Reader

If you are looking for a easy to use and cost effective EID solution, Tag-ie4 is the answer. For only £250+VAT the Tag-ie 4 includes:
• Batching of tag lists
• Weights recording
• 4,000 tag capacity
• Lightweight & IP66 rating

Tag-ie4 is fully compatible with Farm Matters. The software can download data directly from the handset either into your events or to display on screen. History data can be uploaded directly to the handset from Farm Matters with a choice of what data to upload. For more details about Tag-ie4 or to order one, please contact Neil on 0191 3000 189.

Farm Matters Doddle-Ad

Check out our website Farm Matters

Farm Matters is our excellent all-in-one farm management software including:
Cattle
Sheep
Fields
NVZ
Medicines

For more information or to download a free trial go to our website www.farmmatters.co.uk

Badger cull – How effective will it be in stopping bovine TB?

Research carried out by Durham University has claimed that the impact badgers have on spreading TB to cattle is highly overstated. Professor Peter Atkins of Durham University suggests that carefully arranged culling in South West England and South Wales may have a part to play in the reduction of bovine TB but elsewhere may not be justified or particularly effective.

This is contrary to the governments position, who feel their strategy for tackling badger numbers to is the right thing to do to reduce instances of bovine TB. Enivroment Secretary Owen Paterson has recently stated “Having looked at all the evidence over many years, I am utterly convinced that badger control is the right thing to do, and indeed the higher than expected badger numbers only serve to underline the need for urgent action”.

The evidence Paterson talks about definitely exists, instances of bovine TB are higher in areas with badgers and it is medical fact that badgers do suffer from and carry the the same strain of mycobacteria which causes bovine TB. Atkins however suggests that when you look deeper things are more complex than they appear. He claims the Randomised Badger Culling Trial demonstrated the complexity of the issues and that badger culling was unlikely to be effective for controlling bovine TB. Atkins states culling attempts could even “exacerbate the problem” by driving badgers to different areas.

The one thing everyone agrees about is that bovine TB needs to be stopped with 34,897 cattle compulsorily slaughtered as reactors or direct contacts in 2012. It seems there is a growing opinion that badger culling will not be as effective as first thought and that alternative measures need to be reassessed. Suggests include: vaccinating against bovine TB in cattle is forbidden by EU legislation but vaccinating badgers has shown some promising results; further research into an acceptable cattle vaccine and greater lobbying in Europe to make this a priority issue; improved testing; and tighter movement controls.